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Corrine Bailey Rae crossed with James Blake – We review Vivyd Dream’s debut EP - Soapbox

Corrine Bailey Rae crossed with James Blake – We review Vivyd Dream’s debut EP

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Everyone is an experimental genius these days, that’s just the way it is. To find an avenue you can fit into has never been harder in the music industry than it is today, so to see an act hit the jackpot is extremely refreshing. Vivyd Dream is made up of singer/songwriter Miriam O’Shea and Producer Tamas WaTa Varga. The duo seem to have nailed the ever crowding ‘future soul’ genre bracket perfectly, so I took a listen to their Debut EP.

I’m going to come straight out and say it; for the more ‘housey’ sounding tracks, commercially successful acts such as Disclosure and Bondax have clearly played a part in the filling the inspiration tank. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing though, as both acts are lucky enough to possess a production style which is easily transferable to a commercial platform whilst still appearing to their original audience. With tracks such as Dance With U and Stairs this is clearly the approach the duo have taken.

It’s not all ‘Big Top at Bestival’ though. Not Giving Up is a fantastic overall composition. The unusual percussive patterns layered with funky futuristic synth sounds bring a nice bit of additional variety in the tape, rendering it more of a journey than a simple compilation. The same goes for Bubble. It seems like this would be what would be created if Corrine Bailey Rae were to cross paths with a lively James Blake – by that I mean it’s risky but it just works.

The EP finishes up with perhaps the most inventive piece of production on the whole project. You Had Us sounds like a James Bond theme song produced entirely by EDM fanatics and again it’s risky, but the goal was certainly achieved. This was the first time on the EP that Miriam’s pleasant vocal style seems to have been used for more than just an extra layer of instrumentation. Again, this isn’t a bad thing, as the other tracks would seem overly complex and lose their more simplistic charm.

This really is a great debut EP from the duo and we look forward to seeing them delve further into the elements of futuristic funk in the coming months.

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